The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald & Movie Review

Date Published: 1925
Pages: 180
Source: Owned
Format: Paperback

Goodreads SynopsisA portrait of the Jazz Age in all of its decadence and excess, The Great Gatsby captured the spirit of the author’s generation and earned itself a permanent place in American mythology. Self-made, self-invented millionaire Jay Gatsby embodies some of Fitzgerald’s–and his country’s–most abiding obsessions: money, ambition, greed, and the promise of new beginnings. “Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgiastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that’s no matter–tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther…. And one fine morning–“Gatsby’s rise to glory and eventual fall from grace becomes a kind of cautionary tale about the American Dream.

It’s also a love story, of sorts, the narrative of Gatsby’s quixotic passion for Daisy Buchanan. The pair meet five years before the novel begins, when Daisy is a legendary young Louisville beauty and Gatsby an impoverished officer. They fall in love, but while Gatsby serves overseas, Daisy marries the brutal, bullying, but extremely rich Tom Buchanan. After the war, Gatsby devotes himself blindly to the pursuit of wealth by whatever means–and to the pursuit of Daisy, which amounts to the same thing. “Her voice is full of money,” Gatsby says admiringly. His millions made, Gatsby buys a mansion across Long Island Sound from Daisy’s patrician East Egg address, throws lavish parties, and waits for her to appear. When she does, events unfold with detached, cynical neighbor Nick Carraway acting as chorus throughout.

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My View: Sometimes it’s just hype and at other times, the hype is just right. The hype about this one being a classic kept scaring me away, yeah, I am scared of books that take time to enter my head. And that hype was so wrong. Well, atleast in the it being classicy classic way. I took 6 months to read Crime and Punishment and not just because of its hefty size. This? This, I finished in a few hours marathon at night that ended at 4:30 am. Yeah! The hype that was right – of this being a good book. It was. It certainly was.

First few pages (make that 50), I wasn’t sure where this book was heading. And I would certainly not have said it was going great. It was easy to understand and smoothly going by, definitely. But I was curious to know Gatsby, the person the book was named after. And so far it looked that the book was more about the narrator. ‘Hurry up, will you?’, I said. This book is only 140 pages long! I want to know you, Gatsby. Come, meet me.

And then, things changed. Gatsby was being unraveled, and I was liking it. Oh, so this is what he is all about. My my! I would love to have me a man like that. 5 years, did you say! (Not revealing much in order not to give spoilers).

The writing is fluid and makes for an interesting narrative. The plot is innovative, to say the least. And I do love myself some old romance devoid of physical intimacy and sex that are rampant in the current romance genre books. Do I sound like an old lady, because I assure you I am not.

The book is easy to read and one classic you can finish in a few hours. You don’t have to rack your brains over this one, for sure. There are some strange coincidences in this book that make you wonder, ‘oh really; life is certainly a mystery’.

Although I would admit, I read the last couple of pages twice in order to push the author into changing his mind while I was reading it again. Fitzgerald, how could you? I am devastated. I don’t like you, you know? And if you do not change that ending, I may never read another book by you. Are you listening? Of course, he isn’t. Or maybe he’s smirking down at me from heavens above, thinking all the time ‘what a foolish little girl’. *snort* I didn’t like him anyway.

Would I read it again? Probably, even if just for the kicks. Or maybe I will scratch out that end and write it myself. Although it would probably stop being a classic if I did that. But really. How could he? And the narrator, the stupid narrator, worthless. Why could he not open his mouth? Huh. See what Fitzgerald has got me into? Bad mouthing him and his characters. Those are the books I love where the plot and the characters have me all tied in a knot. Although I assure you, I did not cry. I. Did. Not. My mouth could have dropped open in shock though, in all probability. That’s it.

Have you read this one? Are you avoiding it because it’s a classic? Pfft. Read it. It will take only a few hours. 3. 4 maybe. Come on. You can do it. I believe in you. It’s just a simple, little story. And oh, I liked it, in case I forgot to mention. I have a tendency to ramble on. Probably I am doing that right now. Okay, stop! Oh God.

Movie

I am devastated. I don’t know what to say. The movie has done me in. For starters, I am so glad I read the book first because the movie is no way near my imagination. It’s so different! Do you see the book cover above? That’s how my mind imagined it all, in black and white and subtle and classy. The movie? It’s full of colors, and sounds and it’s brashy. It took me some time to get used to that for sure.

And woah, it took me another good while to get used to Spiderman (Toby Maguire) and Jack from Titanic (Leonardo DiCaprio). I just couldn’t picture them together.

Once I got used to the above, I was taken in by that world – the world of color and charm and love and heartbreak. OMG, I think I fell in love with Leonardo all over again. He can say so much without even uttering a word. Oh my, those expressions! How does he do that?

And the music, woah. One of the songs I had heard in a coffee shop 6-8 months back and have been trying to find it and when it came on in the movie, I was zapped. Amazing music.

For most purposes, I think the movie did justice to the book. It took the romantic angle a bit further, rest was keeping in line with the book. But it was while watching the movie that I realised Fitzgerald wrote so beautifully. How could I have missed those lines? I think reading a classic in a 4 hour marathon isn’t the best way, perhaps. And now I feel like I should definitely re-read it. Ahh, the movie makes me want to fall in love all over again. It was beautiful, simply beautiful.

And now I just want to sob. Gatsby, oh my Gatsby. You, the epitome of generosity and love. Nick Carraway said it well, when he did, that they are a rotten bunch, every single one of them. And you, you are the one. The only one!

It’s 90 years to the day the book was written but it’s words still strike true. The selfishness and greed of people, the tendency to serve their own motive without a glance at the other. I wonder sometimes did the world never change or was it the far-seeing eyes of these profound writers?

To sum up, I upped my rating from 3.5 to 4 because this is a masterpiece!

3.5/5 stars – Somewhere between I liked it and I really liked it. 

4/5 stars – I really liked it. Recommended to be read and watched
immediately after. You will be blown away.

And now I want to change it to 4.5!4 stars

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4 thoughts on “The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald & Movie Review

  1. Anuj says:

    Great reviews, both of ’em. I’ll probably read it this weekend. And you’re right classics do intimidate many a times. I heard someone saying classics are the stuff we love to talk about a lot but never try reading. For greed, you should watch ‘The Wolf Of Wall Street’ and for the classy stuff, watch ‘The Godfather’ and ‘American Gangster'(whenever you have time, know you’re busy). “And if you do not change that ending, I may never read another book by you. Or maybe I will scratch out that end and write it myself.” Haha that was a brave statement, I ‘d love to read an ending written by you 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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