Posted in Month TBR Pile, Month Update

Month Wrap-Up: May 2018 and June TBR

Read in May 2018: 13
From my May TBR
 
Others
 

Reviews:

Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman by Haruki MurakamiBeautiful Disaster by Jamie McGuire

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

Participated in Bout of Books 22

Book(s) of the month

Difficult to choose with so many 4 stars but I will go with these
June 2018 TBR
 

2018 Challenge Updates

  1. Read at least 40 books (Goodreads goal) – Goal completed – 48
  2. Read more classics (at least 15) – 6
  3. Read more owned books (at least 20) – 12
  4. Read huge books (at least 3) – Shantaram, Gone with the wind and one more – 0
  5. Re-read  books – 0
  6. Read more non-fiction/ memoir/ autobiography (at least 10) – Goal Completed – 13

Total number of Pages read this year: 11436

2018 ultimate reading challenge

  1. A book you read in school
  2. A book from your childhood
  3. A book published over 100 years agoHeart of Darkness
  4. A book published in the last year – Genuine Fraud
  5. A non-fic book You can do it
  6. A book written by a male author – The Gift of Therapy
  7. A book written by a female authorSunbathing in the rain
  8. A book by someone who isn’t a writer – When breath becomes air
  9. A book that became a film – The painted veil
  10. A book published in the 20th century Changing Planes
  11. A book set in your hometown/ region
  12. A book with a name in the titleA Man called Ove
  13. A book with a number in the title – Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights
  14. A book based on a true storyDying Well
  15. A book someone else recommended – 1984
  16. A book with over 500 pages
  17. A book you can finish in a day – Ghachar Ghochar
  18. A previously banned book
  19. A book with one-word title – Malice
  20. A book translated from another language – Moonrise From the Green Grass Roof
  21. A personal growth book
  22. A memoir or a journal – Tiger tiger
  23. A book by someone from another country – The Notebook
  24. A book set somewhere you’ll visit this yearThe Blue Castle
  25. An award-winning book – Pulitzer Prize – Angela’s Ashes
  26. A book you read in school
  27. A book with a character with your first name
  28. A book with a place in the titleThe Mayor of Casterbridge
  29. A book set in the futureCinder
  30. A play – The live Corpse
  31. A scary book
  32. A funny book – Where did you go, Bernadette
  33. A book of short stories – Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman
  34. A trilogy or series Me Before You
  35. A bestseller The Hate U Give
  36. A book you own but haven’t readHaroun and the sea of stories
  37. A book about philosophy
  38. An epic poem
  39. A Victorian novel
  40. A book of poetry
  41. A book with a colour in the title
  42. A book with an appealing cover – Everything everything
  43. A book about psychology – Love’s executioner and other tales of psychotherapy
  44. A book about science – The Mind’s Eye
  45. A graphic novelAsterix the gaul
  46. A self-published book
  47. A book from a different cultureShanghai Girls
  48. A young adult book – This sky
  49. A book of non-fiction essays – At the same time
  50. A book by an author you haven’t read beforeGifts
  51. A book set in a country you’ve never been to – Into the water
  52. A book set in the place you live today

36/ 52 Done

How was your May reading-wise? Leave a link to your wrap-up post and I’ll come visit.

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Posted in 3 stars, Book reviews

Auroville: Dream and Reality: An Anthology by Akash Kapur

39286244.jpgGenre: Non-Fiction

Date Published: January 17, 2018

Pages: 256

Source: Penguin Random House Review Copy

Goodreads Synopsis: Auroville has a reputation as a cosmopolitan, spiritual township, but it remains an enigma to outside observers. What is life really like in the community? What do its residents believe in, and what are they aspiring toward? This anthology of writing from the community, edited by a long-time resident and representing forty-odd authors from around the world, seeks to shed light not only on Auroville’s ideals but also on its lived reality. The polyphonic narratives in this eclectic collection-including fiction, essays, poetry and drama-capture something of the dreams, hopes, disappointments and sheer hard work that make up this complex, layered and constantly evolving place.

Enlivened by cartoons and accompanied by rare archival photographs, Auroville: Dream and Reality is a view from the inside of this remarkable experiment in communal and intentional living.

Buy it here – Amazon India | Amazon US |  Flipkart |

 Add to Goodreads

My View: Auroville. I had no idea this was a community in itself until a couple of years back. I only knew it as a tourist destination near Pondicherry and that I wasn’t able to visit it on my last visit to Pondicherry a few years ago. However, this book! There was a reason I asked to read and review it. I was intrigued by this whole community in itself. And technology be damned, I am just not the kind of person to google to satisfy her curiosity. Give me a book any day and I am happy. Especially this being an anthology helped.

The book unravels Auroville like I believe has never been done before. From where it all began to why and how, to what has actually turned up, it’s a journey in itself over the years. The anthology gives a plethora of information, lived experiences, pictures to feast your eyes on, and a deeper knowledge of Auroville, its inhabitants, their relationships with others, Auroville, and themselves.

The book is not merely all essays but also prose, poetry, even cartoons. There are love stories with sad endings and relationships that began and those that broke. There is the mission, the dream behind Auroville and the reality that it is, today. The book is raw, replete with truth, hiding nothing, being the way it is.

‘Auroville: Dream and Reality’ has quenched my thirst for walking in its labyrinths of passages and unveiling it like a new bride. I do wish to step into this world of its own, someday. Never to stay but always to visit and see it with my own eyes.

Akash Kapur has done a brilliant job collecting the material for this book. No wonder it has taken him 10 years to do it! But it’s all worth it. A must read for those interested in the magic and mystery of the place called Auroville where people from 45 countries reside together in a jumble of languages but aspiring to abide by the Mother’s mission.

3/5 stars – I liked it
3 stars

Author Bio: 

Akash Kapur is an Indo-American journalist and author. He is the author of a non-fiction book titled India Becoming, which was selected by The New Yorker and The New Republic as a Best Book of 2012; by Newsweek as one of its three Must Reads on Modern India; and by the New York Times Book Review as an “Editors’ Choice.” The book was short listed for the Shakti Bhatt prize, and an episode from the book was also excerpted in The New Yorker magazine.

Thanks to Penguin Random House for the review copy. All opinions expressed are my own and unbiased.