Posted in Month TBR Pile, Month Update

Month Wrap-Up: March 2018 and April TBR

Read in March 2018: 9

Reviews:
Book of the month
4 stars

2018 Challenge Updates

  1. Read at least 40 books (Goodreads goal) – 30
  2. Read more classics (at least 15) – 4
  3. Read more owned books (at least 20) – 6
  4. Read huge books (at least 3) – Shantaram, Gone with the wind and one more – 0
  5. Re-read  books – 0
  6. Read more non-fiction/ memoir/ autobiography (at least 10) – 7

2018 ultimate reading challenge

  1. A book you read in school
  2. A book from your childhood
  3. A book published over 100 years agoHeart of Darkness
  4. A book published in the last year – Genuine Fraud
  5. A non-fic book Love’s executioner and other tales of psychotherapy
  6. A book written by a male author
  7. A book written by a female author
  8. A book by someone who isn’t a writer – When breath becomes air
  9. A book that became a film – The painted veil
  10. A book published in the 20th century Changing Planes
  11. A book set in your hometown/ region
  12. A book with a name in the titleA Man called Ove
  13. A book with a number in the title – Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights
  14. A book based on a true story
  15. A book someone else recommended – 1984
  16. A book with over 500 pages
  17. A book you can finish in a day – Ghachar Ghochar
  18. A previously banned book
  19. A book with one-word title
  20. A book translated from another language – Moonrise From the Green Grass Roof
  21. A personal growth book
  22. A memoir or a journal – Tiger tiger
  23. A book by someone from another country – The Notebook
  24. A book set somewhere you’ll visit this yearThe Blue Castle
  25. An award-winning book
  26. A book you read in school
  27. A book with a character with your first name
  28. A book with a place in the title
  29. A book set in the futureCinder
  30. A play
  31. A scary book
  32. A funny book
  33. A book of short stories
  34. A trilogy or series Me Before You
  35. A bestseller
  36. A book you own but haven’t read
  37. A book about philosophy
  38. An epic poem
  39. A Victorian novel
  40. A book of poetry
  41. A book with a colour in the title
  42. A book with an appealing cover – Everything everything
  43. A book about psychologyThe Mind’s Eye
  44. A book about science –
  45. A graphic novel
  46. A self-published book
  47. A book from a different culture
  48. A young adult book – This sky
  49. A book of non-fiction essays – At the same time
  50. A book by an author you haven’t read beforeGifts
  51. A book set in a country you’ve never been to – Into the water
  52. A book set in the place you live today

How was your March reading-wise? Leave a link to your wrap-up post and I’ll come visit.

 

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Posted in 4 stars, Book reviews, children's

I need to pee by Neha Singh, Meenal Singh, Erik Egerup

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Neha Singh (Story)Meenal Singh (Illustrator)Erik Egerup (Illustrator)

Genre: Children

Date Published: 2018

Pages: 32

Source: Penguin Random House India

Goodreads Synopsis: Rahi simply loves slurping refreshing drinks, and so she always needs to pee. But boy, does she hate public loos! On her way to her aunt’s in Meghalaya, she has to pee on a train as well as stop at a hotel and even the really scary public toilet at the bus depot! And when those around her refuse to help her with her troubles, her only saviour is her Book of Important Quotes. Travel with Rahi and read all about her yucky, icky, sticky adventures in this quirky and vibrant book about the ever-relevant worry of finding safe and clean public restrooms.

Buy it here – Amazon India | Amazon USThe Book Depository | Flipkart |

 Add on Goodreads

My View: Such an innovative book, this, I just had to read it! What? Don’t judge me! I am a kid at heart, you know. And I am sure looking at those brilliant illustrations, anyone would scream with delight. I might have, just a little bit. And so did my three year old niece, with her eyes round and curious and gleaming when she took the book from me.

I am glad someone has written a book on this very important topic. What? Stop laughing! I am serious here. Humph. It’s such a good book to educate children on the laws regarding emptying their bladders in a restaurant or hotel without having to pay or buy something. I love Rahi’s book of important quotes, such a testament to children’s innocence.

I really enjoyed reading this book and so did my niece who learned a lesson or two from it. The beautifully etched illustrations are a delight to behold. I know my niece would be after my life to read and re-read it to her until she has got it backwards (the process has already begun). Get your hands on this, all you parents and uncles and doting aunts. Your kid is going to love it! (And you will too. Shhh.)

4/5 stars – I really liked it. 
4 stars

Thank you Penguin Random House India for the review copy. All opinions are my own and unbiased.

Posted in 3.5 stars, Book reviews

Still Me (Me Before You #3) by Jojo Moyes

36598421.jpgGenre: Fiction

Date Published: January 23, 2018

Pages: 480

Source: Penguin Random House Review Copy

Goodreads Synopsis: Lou Clark knows too many things . . .

She knows how many miles lie between her new home in New York and her new boyfriend Sam in London.

She knows her employer is a good man and she knows his wife is keeping a secret from him.

What Lou doesn’t know is she’s about to meet someone who’s going to turn her whole life upside down.

Because Josh will remind her so much of a man she used to know that it’ll hurt.

Lou won’t know what to do next, but she knows that whatever she chooses is going to change everything. 

Buy it here – Amazon India | Amazon USThe Book Depository | Flipkart |

 Add on Goodreads

My View: I am glad I don’t read the first book in the series the moment it is out. It gives me the privilege to read the series back to back. I think that’s helpful as I have a terrible memory and I need to read the next book right away. This was one of those series that I read back to back. And boy, am I glad?

After reading not so good reviews of ‘After You’, I still decided to listen to it as an audiobook and happened to love it. So when I saw ‘Still Me’ was up for review, I snagged it right away from Penguin Random House.

And that was when I decided to sacrifice my four night’s sleep. Not like four full nights but a couple hours every night for four consecutive days. Although I didn’t regret that behavior when I kept telling myself, just half an hour more, just an hour more. But did I regret it when I had to wake up for work in the morning? Ah, yes! But did I repeat the same thing for three more days? I sure did. Call it crazy, call it insane. But I had to know what was going to happen to Lou. She no longer was a mere character. I had got to know her intimately for so long. I couldn’t just let it unroll slowly. That would have been painful. So for four nights, every couple of hours, I was in Lou’s world, getting better acquainted, crying with her, smiling with her and just being there. Moyes captivated me with Lou and her family. Oh, I do love her family. And Lou. She’s just one of a kind. I wonder if someone like her exists. I think I would want her as a friend. She’s that kind of a girl.

Yes, the plot goes from A to Z, there are way too many twists and turns. Some I like, others I just go along with to see how things will fare for Lou. But hardly at any point was I tempted to keep the book down or take a break. Nah. Joyes had my attention with every word. I just couldn’t look away except when the clock struck 1am and I had to, without wanting to, shut it down and get some winks.

There are new characters in this book, several of whom I love and some I hate. Each of them holds their own and are adequately etched for the reader to feel like we know them personally. Lou’s family, ah. I do love them, I really do. And Lily. Lily is amazing even though she has a very minor part to play in this book. Her actions made me laugh. 😀

I think Moyes is done with the series. To be honest, I am a little sad. I was mesmerized with Lou and her life. And after reading the three books, one after the other, there’s a gaping hole in me which wants more of Lou. I know many readers are quite done with her. But I liked knowing Lou and her character has developed by leaps and bounds with each book. That sure is something to enjoy.

I think you should get this one if you are following the series. It won’t disappoint you.

3.5/5 stars – Somewhere between ‘I liked it’ and ‘I really liked it’. 
images-25

Author Bio:

Jojo Moyes is a British novelist.

Moyes studied at Royal Holloway, University of London. She won a bursary financed by The Independent newspaper to study journalism at City University and subsequently worked for The Independent for 10 years. In 2001 she became a full-time novelist.

Moyes’ novel Foreign Fruit won the Romantic Novelists’ Association (RNA) Romantic Novel of the Year in 2004.

She is married to journalist Charles Arthur and has three children.

Thank you, Penguin Random House for the review copy. All views expressed are my own and unbiased.

Posted in 4 stars, Book reviews

The Painted Veil by W. Somerset Maugham

99664.jpgGenre: Classics

Date Published: April 1925

Pages: 246

Source: Owned paperback

Goodreads Synopsis:

Set in England and Hong Kong in the 1920s, The Painted Veil is the story of the beautiful, but love-starved Kitty Fane.

When her husband discovers her adulterous affair, he forces her to accompany him to the heart of a cholera epidemic. Stripped of the British society of her youth and the small but effective society she fought so hard to attain in Hong Kong, she is compelled by her awakening conscience to reassess her life and learn how to love.

The Painted Veil is a beautifully written affirmation of the human capacity to grow, to change, and to forgive.

Buy it here – Amazon India | Amazon USThe Book Depository | Flipkart Add on Goodreads

My View:  Ah this book! *Sigh* I am so glad I bought a copy of my own. The book had me in its clutches from page 1 and never let go. This is such a beautiful piece of literature. The plot is worth swooning over, the characters real and fleshed out, and the writing is beautiful.

Kitty is a marvellous character. There are so many shades to her. The book is adequately paced making you want to go on reading. There are heartbreaks and reality-orientation moments which devastate you as a reader. And that, I believe, is one of the signs of a good book. You’re so invested in it, in the characters that you feel their pain, you feel their sense of loss and are bereft.

I wish it had ended differently but then it won’t have been the book it is, now. It’s not at all classic-y in that going-on-forever and hard-to-hold-interest-at-times kind of book. It’s a quick read. I wonder if the movie is as good. Have you read the book, seen the movie? What do you think?

4/5 stars – I really liked it.
4 stars

Author Bio:

William Somerset Maugham was born in Paris in 1874. He spoke French even before he spoke a word of English, a fact to which some critics attribute the purity of his style.

His parents died early and, after an unhappy boyhood, which he recorded poignantly in Of Human Bondage, Maugham became a qualified physician. But writing was his true vocation. For ten years before his first success, he almost literally starved while pouring out novels and plays.

During World War I, Maugham worked for the British Secret Service. He travelled all over the world, and made many visits to America. After World War II, Maugham made his home in south of France and continued to move between England and Nice till his death in 1965.

Posted in 4 stars, Book reviews

After You by Jojo Moyes

25041504.jpgGenre: Fiction

Date Published: September 29, 2014

Pages: 353

Source: Library (Audiobook)

Goodreads Synopsis: “You’re going to feel uncomfortable in your new world for a bit. But I hope you feel a bit exhilarated too. Live boldly. Push yourself. Don’t settle. Just live well. Just live. Love, Will.”

How do you move on after losing the person you loved? How do you build a life worth living?

Louisa Clark is no longer just an ordinary girl living an ordinary life. After the transformative six months spent with Will Traynor, she is struggling without him. When an extraordinary accident forces Lou to return home to her family, she can’t help but feel she’s right back where she started.

Her body heals, but Lou herself knows that she needs to be kick-started back to life. Which is how she ends up in a church basement with the members of the Moving On support group, who share insights, laughter, frustrations, and terrible cookies. They will also lead her to the strong, capable Sam Fielding—the paramedic, whose business is life and death, and the one man who might be able to understand her. Then a figure from Will’s past appears and hijacks all her plans, propelling her into a very different future…

For Lou Clark, life after Will Traynor means learning to fall in love again, with all the risks that brings. But here Jojo Moyes gives us two families, as real as our own, whose joys and sorrows will touch you deeply, and where both changes and surprises await.

Buy it here – Amazon India | Amazon USThe Book Depository | Flipkart |

 Add on Goodreads

My View: Me before you broke my heart. And I wanted to repair it somehow. When I read the reviews of this one, they weren’t very promising but I needed something to fill that gap in my heart and immediately decided to listen to this on audio. Best decision ever!

Of course, there is no Will in here and that is sad. But the turn this book takes left me gaping. Very ingenious of Moyes to say the least. This book was so addictive. I wanted to listen to it all day long. No wonder I finished the 10-hour audiobook in 3 weekdays!

I am not sure if it was the medium but I found myself much more invested in this book even more than I was in Me before you. And I cried, twice, in this book and not once in Me before you. Yeah, how could I not cry about that! I know, I know. I just didn’t. I have a feeling it was a job well done on the part of the narrator, Anna Acton. She was marvellous. I couldn’t listen at my usual 1.5 speed because British accent is difficult for me to grasp at normal speed let alone the faster one. So I went slow with it but perhaps that is why I could feel and be one with all the emotions Lou was undergoing.

Yes, there are twists and turns in here which will sometime frustrate you and it does seem like a really long book but nevertheless, it was worth it. I know many people have been criticizing Moyes for writing this one and wanted it to end with Me before you but I am one of those that disagree. I think despite it being a series, we should look at each book on its own merit. To be frank, I liked this one more than the first one!

Just keep an open mind and you will love it. Don’t go comparing it to Me before you. Get to know Lou a bit better, understand her changed life circumstances, empathize with her and let her take you over completely. 🙂

Oh, and my advice, go for the audiobook.

4/5 stars – I really liked it. 
4 stars

Author Bio:

Jojo Moyes is a British novelist.

Moyes studied at Royal Holloway, University of London. She won a bursary financed by The Independent newspaper to study journalism at City University and subsequently worked for The Independent for 10 years. In 2001 she became a full time novelist.

Moyes’ novel Foreign Fruit won the Romantic Novelists’ Association (RNA) Romantic Novel of the Year in 2004.

She is married to journalist Charles Arthur and has three children.

Posted in Month Update

Month Wrap-Up: February 2018

 Read in February 2018: 11

Shooting an Elephant/>

Book of the month
4.5 stars

2018 Challenge Updates

  1. Read at least 40 books (Goodreads goal) – 22
  2. Read more classics (at least 15) – 3
  3. Read more owned books (at least 20) – 5
  4. Read huge books (at least 3) – Shantaram, Gone with the wind and one more – 0
  5. Re-read  books – 0
  6. Read more non-fiction/ memoir/ autobiography (at least 10) – 5

2018 ultimate reading challenge

  1. A book you read in school
  2. A book from your childhood
  3. A book published over 100 years agoHeart of Darkness
  4. A book published in the last year – Genuine Fraud
  5. A non-fic book
  6. A book written by a male author
  7. A book written by a female author
  8. A book by someone who isn’t a writer – When breath becomes air
  9. A book that became a film – The painted veil
  10. A book published in the 20th centuryMe before you
  11. A book set in your hometown/ region
  12. A book with a name in the title
  13. A book with a number in the title – Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights
  14. A book based on a true story
  15. A book someone else recommended
  16. A book with over 500 pages
  17. A book you can finish in a day – Ghachar Ghochar
  18. A previously banned book
  19. A book with one-word title
  20. A book translated from another language – Moonrise From the Green Grass Roof
  21. A personal growth book
  22. A memoir or a journal – Tiger tiger
  23. A book by someone from another country – The Notebook
  24. A book set somewhere you’ll visit this yearThe Blue Castle
  25. An award-winning book
  26. A book you read in school
  27. A book with a character with your first name
  28. A book with a place in the title
  29. A book set in the futureCinder
  30. A play
  31. A scary book
  32. A funny book
  33. A book of short stories
  34. A trilogy or series
  35. A bestseller
  36. A book you own but haven’t read
  37. A book about philosophy
  38. An epic poem
  39. A Victorian novel
  40. A book of poetry
  41. A book with a colour in the title
  42. A book with an appealing cover – Everything everything
  43. A book about psychology
  44. A book about science
  45. A graphic novel
  46. A self-published book
  47. A book from a different culture
  48. A young adult book – This sky
  49. A book of non-fiction essays – At the same time
  50. A book by an author you haven’t read beforeGifts
  51. A book set in a country you’ve never been to – Into the water
  52. A book set in the place you live today

How was your February reading-wise? Leave a link to your wrap-up post and I’ll come visit.

Posted in 3.5 stars, Book reviews

Me Before You by Jojo Moyes

15507958.jpgGenre: Romance

Date Published: December 31, 2012

Pages: 369

Source: Library

Goodreads Synopsis: Louisa Clark is an ordinary young woman living an exceedingly ordinary life—steady boyfriend, close family—who has never been farther afield than their tiny village. She takes a badly needed job working for ex-Master of the Universe Will Traynor, who is wheelchair-bound after an accident. Will has always lived a huge life—big deals, extreme sports, worldwide travel—and now he’s pretty sure he cannot live the way he is.

Will is acerbic, moody, bossy—but Lou refuses to treat him with kid gloves, and soon his happiness means more to her than she expected. When she learns that Will has shocking plans of his own, she sets out to show him that life is still worth living.

A love story for this generation, Me Before You brings to life two people who couldn’t have less in common—a heartbreakingly romantic novel that asks, What do you do when making the person you love happy also means breaking your own heart?

Buy it here – Amazon India | Amazon USThe Book Depository | Flipkart |

 Add on Goodreads

My View:  Wow. I am still reeling from the after effects. This book sure had a lot going for it. I mean, look at the concept. It’s so fresh, hasn’t been done earlier. I really applaud the author for taking on such a sensitive yet risky plot and bringing it to life.

Lou and Will shine as characters. You get to know them intimately. But my favorite characters were Lou’s family. They sure are a riot!

Although the book is full of sad moments, it still retains a sense of humor and I love that about it. I love the fact that despite the overall sadness of the plot, the author ensured the reality of life showed through. Humor does seep in, in real life scenarios, sometimes in the toughest of situations.

A huge sigh of relief was also the relationship between Lou and Will which was given just the right amount of leeway and it was closer to real life than all the insta-love I usually get to read (insert eyeroll here).

Overall, an innovative plot with vividly etched characters and a true to life depiction. Well worth a quick read.

Have you read it? Did you watch the movie? Should I watch the movie? Let me know.

3.5/5 stars – Somewhere between ‘I liked it’ and ‘I really liked it’. 
images-25

Author Bio:

Jojo Moyes is a British novelist.

Moyes studied at Royal Holloway, University of London. She won a bursary financed by The Independent newspaper to study journalism at City University and subsequently worked for The Independent for 10 years. In 2001 she became a full time novelist.

Moyes’ novel Foreign Fruit won the Romantic Novelists’ Association (RNA) Romantic Novel of the Year in 2004.

She is married to journalist Charles Arthur and has three children.

 

Posted in 4.5 stars, Book reviews

At the Same Time: Essays and Speeches by Susan Sontag

903115.jpgGenre: Essays

Date Published: March 6, 2007

Pages: 235

Source: Library

Goodreads Synopsis: “A writer is someone who pays attention to the world,” Susan Sontag said in her 2003 acceptance speech for the Peace Prize of the German Book Trade, and no one exemplified this definition more than she. Sontag’s incisive intelligence, expressive brilliance, and deep curiosity about art, politics, and the writer’s responsibility to bear witness have secured her place as one of the most important thinkers and writers of the twentieth century. At the Same Time gathers sixteen essays and addresses written in the last years of Sontag’s life, when her work was being honored on the international stage, that reflect on the personally liberating nature of literature, her deepest commitment, and on political activism and resistance to injustice as an ethical duty. She considers the works of writers from the little-known Soviet novelist Leonid Tsypkin, who struggled and eventually succeeded in publishing his only book days before his death; to the greats, such as Nadine Gordimer, who enlarge our capacity for moral judgment. Sontag also fearlessly addresses the dilemmas of post-9/11 America, from the degradation of our political rhetoric to the appalling torture of prisoners in Abu Ghraib.

At the Same Time, which includes a foreword by her son, David Rieff, is a passionate, compelling work from an American writer at the height of her powers, who always saw literature “as a passport to enter a larger life, the zone of freedom.”

Buy it here – Amazon India | Amazon USThe Book Depository | Flipkart |

 Add on Goodreads

My View:  I don’t really remember how I heard about Susan Sontag except it was in one of my bookish whatsapp groups (umm yeah, they exist, I am a part of two). And I tucked it away in the back of my mind. On my visit to the library a couple of months back, I stumbled upon ‘In America’ by her but the title didn’t interest me much. What did I have to do with America anyhow? And I put it back on the shelf.

And then I came across this book by Sontag on my recent library visit. I contemplated keeping it back. I wasn’t sure if I was in the mood for essays (I usually never am. Those were things written and memorized in school and never read again.) but I decided to bring it home. It sat beside my bed while I read fictional works I had issued. And finally I decided to atleast get a flavor of what it was about. The introduction by Sontag’s son, Davie Rieff piqued my curiosity. And thereafter I didn’t look back, turning page upon page until I devoured it, albeit a bit slow in the beginning and faster at the end.

It was a brilliant read. I think I am in love with Sontag. And I deeply mourn her loss. I wish she was alive now. I am sure she would have so much to say about Trump’s win and the state of America now. She seems very vocal and unfazed by critics and people in the power. I admire her tenacity and bravado. We need more people like her.

My favorite essay in this book was on Pasternak, Tsvetayeva and Rilke. How she talks about their personal and professional lives giving us a peek into their private lives. Mesmerizing!

I deeply appreciate her insights into books, the lives of authors, political situations and almost everything under the sun. She’s well read, thorough in her research, and her writing just pulls you in and keeps you focused. I could feel the time she has taken in penning down each and every word. I totally am with her when she says not many writers today are knowledgeable. They don’t know about the world they reside in. I agree when she says it’s important as a writer to know what’s happening around.

Ah. The feeling. The aftertaste this book leaves in your mouth. You feel like just sitting for a while, letting it all sink in. To not let that get murky by reading another book. *Sigh*

I need to pick up another book by her. I am gravitating towards ‘Regarding the pain of others’. Have you read Sontag? Which book of hers do you recommend?

4.5/5 stars – Somewhere between ‘I really liked it’ and ‘I loved it’.
images

Author Bio:

Susan Sontag was born in New York City on January 16, 1933, grew up in Tucson, Arizona, and attended high school in Los Angeles. She received her B.A. from the College of the University of Chicago and did graduate work in philosophy, literature, and theology at Harvard University and Saint Anne’s College, Oxford.

Her books, all published by Farrar, Straus & Giroux, include four novels, The Benefactor, Death Kit, The Volcano Lover, and In America; a collection of short stories, I, etcetera; several plays, including Alice in Bed and Lady from the Sea; and nine works of nonfiction, starting with Against Interpretation and including On Photography, Illness as Metaphor, Where the Stress Falls, Regarding the Pain of Others, and At the Same Time. In 1982, FSG published A Susan Sontag Reader.

Ms. Sontag wrote and directed four feature-length films: Duet for Cannibals (1969) and Brother Carl (1971), both in Sweden; Promised Lands (1974), made in Israel during the war of October 1973; and Unguided Tour (1983), from her short story of the same name, made in Italy. Her play Alice in Bed has had productions in the United States, Mexico, Germany, and Holland. Another play, Lady from the Sea, has been produced in Italy, France, Switzerland, Germany, and Korea.

Ms. Sontag also directed plays in the United States and Europe, including a staging of Beckett’s Waiting for Godot in the summer of 1993 in besieged Sarajevo, where she spent much of the time between early 1993 and 1996 and was made an honorary citizen of the city.

A human rights activist for more than two decades, Ms. Sontag served from 1987 to 1989 as president of the American Center of PEN, the international writers’ organization dedicated to freedom of expression and the advancement of literature, from which platform she led a number of campaigns on behalf of persecuted and imprisoned writers.

Her stories and essays appeared in newspapers, magazines, and literary publications all over the world, including The New York Times, The New Yorker, The New York Review of Books, The Times Literary Supplement, Art in America, Antaeus, Parnassus, The Threepenny Review, The Nation, and Granta. Her books have been translated into thirty-two languages.

Among Ms. Sontag’s many honors are the 2003 Peace Prize of the German Book Trade, the 2003 Prince of Asturias Prize, the 2001 Jerusalem Prize, the National Book Award for In America (2000), and the National Book Critics Circle Award forOn Photography (1978). In 1992 she received the Malaparte Prize in Italy, and in 1999 she was named a Commandeur de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French government (she had been named an Officier in the same order in 1984). Between 1990 and 1995 she was a MacArthur Fellow.

Ms. Sontag died in New York City on December 28, 2004.

Posted in 3.5 stars, Book reviews

Genuine Fraud by E. Lockhart

33843362.jpgGenre: Young Adult/ Mystery

Date Published: September 5, 2017

Pages: 264

Source: Bloomsbury India Review Copy

Goodreads SynopsisFrom the author of the unforgettable New York Times bestseller We Were Liars comes a masterful new psychological suspense novel–the story of a young woman whose diabolical smarts are her ticket into a charmed life. But how many times can someone reinvent themselves? You be the judge.

Imogen is a runaway heiress, an orphan, a cook, and a cheat.
Jule is a fighter, a social chameleon, and an athlete.
An intense friendship. A disappearance. A murder, or maybe two.
A bad romance, or maybe three.
Blunt objects, disguises, blood, and chocolate. The American dream, superheroes, spies, and villains.
A girl who refuses to give people what they want from her.
A girl who refuses to be the person she once was.

Buy it here – Amazon India | Amazon USThe Book Depository | Flipkart |

 Add on Goodreads

My View:  I had heard so many good things about ‘We were liars’ that when I got an opportunity to read this one by E. Lockhart, I dived at it.

Genuine Fraud pulls you right in. That was my first emotion.

And the last? After I was done reading the book – ‘What did I just read. OMG!’

Yeah, well. This book will ‘play crazy’ (insert the abusive word here) with your mind. Like really! I have never read such a creative work that takes you back. In time. Literally. No,  there’s no flashback. It’s all written in the opposite order. You go from present to the past when it all began, one chapter at a time. It’s like, wow. I really need to understand how she wrote it. Haha. Intriguing!

It’s unputdownable. I love me some crazy characters and Genuine Fraud is swarming with them. The writing is clear, precise and to the point. I finished the book in a marathon read of two days (would have finished it sooner were I at home and under usual circumstances).

Jule is my favorite character. I only wish she would have done something more, something different. But well, I didn’t write the book. And Lockart did a good enough job!

If you like a crazy, mind-boggling mystery, thriller you can finish in one sitting. This. This should be your pick.

3.5/5 stars – Somewhere between ‘I liked it’ and ‘I really liked it’.
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Author Bio:

E. Lockhart is the author of Genuine Fraud, We Were Liars, The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks, The Boyfriend List and several other novels.

website: www.emilylockhart.com
Liars site: www.wewereliars.com
blog: www.theboyfriendlist.com
Twitter: elockhart

 

Many thanks to Bloomsbury India for providing the review copy. All views are my own and unbiased.

Posted in Month Update

Month Wrap-Up: January 2018

I know it’s a little too late to do this wrap-up but well, life’s been busy.  Here’s what I read last month.
Read in January 2018: 11
22854394
Book of the month
 4 stars

2018 Challenge Updates

  1. Read at least 40 books (Goodreads goal) – 11 read
  2. Read more classics (at least 15) – 2
  3. Read more owned books (at least 20) – 0
  4. Read huge books (at least 3) – Shantaram, Gone with the wind and one more – 0
  5. Re-read two favorite books – Anna Karenina and Thirteenth Tale – 0
  6. Read more non-fiction/ memoir/ autobiography (at least 10) – 1

2018 ultimate reading challenge

  1. A book you read in school
  2. A book from your childhood
  3. A book published over 100 years agoHeart of Darkness
  4. A book published in the last year
  5. A non-fic book
  6. A book written by a male author
  7. A book written by a female author
  8. A book by someone who isn’t a writer
  9. A book that became a film – The painted veil
  10. A book published in the 20th century
  11. A book set in your hometown/ region
  12. A book with a name in the title
  13. A book with a number in the title – Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights
  14. A book based on a true story
  15. A book someone else recommended
  16. A book with over 500 pages
  17. A book you can finish in a day – Ghachar Ghochar
  18. A previously banned book
  19. A book with one-word title
  20. A book translated from another language – Moonrise From the Green Grass Roof
  21. A personal growth book
  22. A memoir or a journal – Tiger tiger
  23. A book by someone from another country – 
  24. A book set somewhere you’ll visit this year
  25. An award-winning book
  26. A book you read in school
  27. A book with a character with your first name
  28. A book with a place in the title
  29. A book set in the future
  30. A play
  31. A scary book
  32. A funny book
  33. A book of short stories
  34. A trilogy or series
  35. A bestseller
  36. A book you own but haven’t read
  37. A book about philosophy
  38. An epic poem
  39. A Victorian novel
  40. A book of poetry
  41. A book with a colour in the title
  42. A book with an appealing cover – Everything everything
  43. A book about psychology
  44. A book about science
  45. A graphic novel
  46. A self-published book
  47. A book from a different culture
  48. A young adult book – This sky
  49. A book of non-fiction essays
  50. A book by an author you haven’t read before
  51. A book set in a country you’ve never been to – Into the water
  52. A book set in the place you live today

How was your January reading-wise? Leave a link to your wrap-up post and I’ll come visit.